Single Column or Dozen Roulette Progression System

single column roulette systemThe Single Column System with progression is more of a high variance system (it has relatively low table coverage). However, your return on individual bets is higher should your column come in.

Play the Single Column Roulette System at Virgin Games Roulette

You are covering one column, so 12 numbers, and you are going to repeat bet on the column you choose until you win. You can also play this on the dozens of course- this bet also covers 12 numbers or 32.4% of the table on a European Roulette wheel (31.6% on an American Wheel). We strongly recommend that you play this system on a European wheel with one zero- if the ball lands in the zero, you will lose that step of the progression, so it makes sense to play with as few zeros as possible.

Many people like to wait for a sleeping column (or dozen) by tracking the wheel until you see one column or dozen "sleeping" for 5 spins in a row. You can only do this on a real table of course, so if this is your modus operandi, head over to our live roulette tables and pick a casino from that list.

Now the disadvantages of playing a high variance system like this with low table coverage are obvious- the probability of you winning a single spin is lower than low variance bets like the even money bets or systems that cover an even higher percentage of the table, such as the 2 Columns System. The system tries to mitigate that with a negative progression system, where you increase your bets after a loss to cover previous losses with your last win.

And here's where the high variance bet comes into its own. On many progression systems like the Martingale system, the bets ramp up quickly after a succession of losses. This can increase your risk and may mean that you hit the table limits leaving yu unable to cover losses from previous rounds.

The progression on the Single Column or Dozen System is gentler- giving you more room to continue the progression.

How to Play the Single Column System

how to playWe are going to assume that your starting bet is £10.

1. Identify a column or dozen for your run. It can be chosen at random, or based on previous results- some people like to bet on columns or dozens that haven't hit for 5 spins- so called "Sleeping Beauties". Theoretically, it makes no difference unless the wheel you are playing on has a bias. The wheel has no memory, but if it helps you to choose a column, then there is no harm in using a method like this. We tend to pick columns or dozens that haven't hit for a couple of spins, but we are not rigorous about it.

2. Bet £10 (or a multiple of this number- you decide your appetite for risk) on the first spin.
If this bet wins, you are all good, and you will be £20 in profit. Go back to step (1) above)

3. If you lose, bet again on the same column or dozen, but this time bet £15.
Every time you lose, you are going to increase your bet by approximately 50%, so the progression is as follows:

10, 15, 23, 34, 51, 76, 114, 171, 256, 384.

If at any point you win, you finish that run and your next bet will be on a new column or dozen at your starting bet.

Your aim is to record a win within a progression of 10 bets. Your overall profit in the run at any point of time will be £20. If you manage this on the first spin, you will have generated a profit of £20 of a £10 bet- an excellent return.

However, if it takes you 10 spins to record a win, you will have invested £1133 in total for a £20. Not so good, and a bit of a white knuckle ride!